Modeling Periodic Structures in RF and Optics

February 17, 20212:00 PM - 2:45 PM EST

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Periodic structures are of great importance in optical, microwave, and antenna engineering. Well-known examples include optical gratings, photonic crystals, metamaterials, frequency selective surfaces, and phased array antennas.

Join us for a presentation of how to model periodic structures in COMSOL Multiphysics® using the RF and Wave Optics modules. The webinar will also cover some important news for the RF and Wave Optics modules in version 5.6.

Some of the topics that will be covered include periodic ports, the handling of diffraction orders, Floquet periodic boundary conditions, and the visualization of the polarization state.

Among the new functionality added to the RF and Wave Optics modules, the following topics will be covered: fast asymptotic scattering, fast port sweep, new launch connectors (in the RF Parts Library), the Polarization plot type, updates to the Scattering and Matched boundary conditions, synchronization of material parameters, and a brief discussion of the new tutorial models added in version 5.6.

Register for Modeling Periodic Structures in RF and Optics

February 17, 2021 2:00 PM - 2:45 PM EST
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Webinar Details

This event will be held online.

Date and Time

February 17, 2021 | 2:00 PM EST (UTC-05:00)

Speaker

Ulf Olin
COMSOL

Ulf Olin is a product specialist within the electromagnetics group at COMSOL. Before joining COMSOL in 2011, he worked in optics research at the Institute of Optical Research in Stockholm and in optics and fiber optics research for various companies. He is also an associate professor (docent) of physics at KTH in Stockholm.