Model Gallery

The Model Gallery features COMSOL Multiphysics model files from a wide variety of application areas including the electrical, mechanical, fluid, and chemical disciplines. You can download ready-to-use models and step-by-step instructions for building the model, and use these as a starting point for your own modeling work. Use the Quick Search to find models relevant to your area of expertise, and login or create a COMSOL Access account that is associated with a valid COMSOL license to download the model files.

Turbulent Flow over a Backward-Facing Step

The backward facing step is an interesting case for studying the performance and solution strategy of a turbulence model. In this case, the flow is subjected to a sudden increase of cross-sectional area, resulting in a separation of flow starting at the point of expansion. Spatial variations in the velocity field cause production of turbulence outside the wall region and its interaction with ...

Modeling Nonisothermal Flow with Gravity Volume Forces

The influence of gravity on the flow pattern is often an important issue when modeling flow in fluids with variable density. You can account for this influence in the model equations by adding, to the momentum balances, the volume force. This model shows a simple example of the implementation of boundary conditions when volumetric forces are included in the momentum balances. This can be used ...

Water Purification Reactor

Water purification for turning natural water into drinking water is a process constituted of several steps. At least one step must be a disinfectant step. One way to achieve efficient disinfection in an environmentally friendly way is to use ozone. A typical ozone purification reactor is about 40 m long and resembles a maze with partial walls or baffles that divide the space into room-sized ...

Flow in a Bubble Column Reactor

This example illustrates multiphase flow modeling in a bubble column reactor. The reactor is filled with water and gas bubbles are injected from the bottom. Due to buoyancy, the bubbles rise, inducing a circulating motion of the liquid. Furthermore, as the bubbles rise through the water, gas dissolves from the bubbles into the liquid. The example uses the macroscopic, two-phase flow model ...

The Magnus Effect

The Magnus effect explains the curl that soccer players can give the ball, resulting in the enjoyable goals that we can see in every World Cup™. This model looks at the Magnus effect in the laminar and turbulent flow regimes for transient and stationary flows. It also discusses the simulation results and relates them to experimental measurements on soccer balls found in the literature.

Flow in an Airlift Loop Reactor

This example illustrates multiphase flow modeling in an airlift loop reactor. The reactor is filled with water and air bubbles are injected at the bottom through two frits. Due to buoyancy, the bubbles rise, inducing a circulating motion of the liquid. The model specifically investigates the effect of including bubble-induced turbulence.

Swirl Flow Around a Rotating Disk

Swirl flow is an application that involves steady rotational flow around an axis. Rather than modeling this process in 3D, COMSOL Multiphysics provides a 2D axisymmetric interface where the flow in the rotational direction is still included in the equations. This example shows the effect of a rotating cylinder on the flow in a container. Such applications are often used in chemical kinetic ...

Syngas Combustion in a Round-Jet Burner

The model simulates non-premixed turbulent combustion of syngas (synthesis gas) in a simple round-jet burner. Syngas is a gas mixture, primarily composed of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The name syngas relates to its use in creating synthetic natural gas. In the model, syngas is fed from a pipe into an open region with a slow co-flow of air. Upon exiting the pipe, the syngas ...

Removing Contaminants in a Secondary Sedimentation Clarifier

Wastewater treatment is a several-step process for removing contaminants. Firstly, large, solid particles are removed through sedimentation, flotation, and filtration. And then in a second step, biological treatment causes the smaller particles to aggregate, forming so called flocs. These flocs can be more easily removed by processes such as sedimentation. In a circular secondary clarifier, ...

Separation Through Electrocoalescence

Applying an electric field across a suspension of immiscible liquids may stimulate droplets of the same phase to coalesce. The method known as electrocoalescence has important applications, for instance, in the separation of oil from water. To model electrocoalescence, you need to solve the Navier-Stokes equations, describing the fluid motion, as well as track the interfaces between the ...

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