Fluid

Fanny Littmarck | October 24, 2012

It’s no secret that there’s a lot of guesswork involved in oil production. Oil companies make “Big Money” decisions based on estimates – estimates with huge margins of error. What’s more, there is an incredible amount of risk involved, but with the potential for a large pay-off if all goes according to plan. The plan is based on “best guesses” and less than perfect data. Still, there are many big players in the oil industry that are doing very well […]

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Cinzia Iacovelli | October 23, 2012

When you work with multiphysics all day you tend to notice physics phenomena everywhere you go. For me, one such moment was when I was walking on the beach this past summer. I noticed that the sand appears whiter around a person’s feet than elsewhere. You may have noticed this too, and like I, wondered “why?” This phenomenon can be explained by the theory of poroelasticity.

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Fanny Littmarck | October 17, 2012

About a month ago we had a webinar on CFD, and one of the demonstrated examples was the modeling of fluid flow from an inkjet. This technology has many applications and is a great example of how accurate CFD simulation is being used in the design process.

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Fanny Littmarck | August 21, 2012

When it gets dark, you flick on the lights. If you were to model this simple example, you would need to take all forms of heat transfer within consideration; convection, conduction, and radiation are all at play when a light bulb is flicked on.

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Cinzia Iacovelli | August 17, 2012

During a recent Heat Transfer Simulations webinar we demonstrated some good examples using “everyday life” type scenarios. Heat transfer occurs in many situations indeed: potatoes cooking in the microwave, hot coffee in a cup, and on the beach, with solar radiation. And most of us have at some point boiled water to make pasta for dinner. Heat transfer is at work then too.

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Valerio Marra | July 19, 2012

Remember those retro desk ornaments of the 1960’s, those lamps filled with colorful wax that began to move when the lamp was lit? I’m talking about lava lamps, or as I like to call them, “Rayleigh–Taylor instability machines”. They may not be popular among today’s youth, but I still own one and I thought it would be interesting to look beyond the dyed blobs of wax and observe the physics involved in lava lamps.

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Phil Kinnane | July 16, 2012

David Kan has previously blogged very well about the Pipe Flow Module, where he described the fundamentals behind this new product of ours. Now, you can see this module in action at a webinar run on July 19th. Check out the details and registration for the upcoming Pipe Flow Simulation Using COMSOL webinar.

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Phil Kinnane | July 10, 2012

During the last few months, we have been offering “lunch time tutorials” for users and others interested in multiphysics modeling. In these webinar-run tutorials, we choose an application and spend a bit of time looking at it, and how to model it in detail. We’ve already reported about an example that models a gate valve and now we are ready to offer an example related to pollution, namely that of a particle plume that spreads throughout a room.

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Fanny Littmarck | July 2, 2012

We’ve been running these “Lunch Time Web Tutorials” over the past couple of months, featuring 45 minutes of solving a particular problem following a comprehensive step-by-step format. Each webisode involves a different type of engineering problem, one of which focused on the modeling of a gate valve in a pipe branch. We are now making this available as a set of two videos for those who missed the live tutorial.

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David Kan | June 22, 2012

We developed COMSOL Multiphysics to empower the engineering and science communities with state-of-the-art simulation tools. A key ingredient of this empowerment is flexibility. COMSOL users are already well aware of the full compatibility between various physics. This means you can put any (yes, really any) combination of COMSOL physics together. But that’s not the only way our multiphysics simulation tool is flexible.

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Phil Kinnane | June 11, 2012

Before you drink your next pint of Guinness, have a close look at the bubbles in the brew, and see if they sink. Apparently they do. Now a group of scientists from the University of Limerick in Ireland (where else?) has modeled the phenomenon of sinking bubbles in Guinness beer to lend weight to this finding and provide a theoretical explanation.

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